15 Most Aggressive Cichlids (CA/SA/WA): A Curated List

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Don’t be shocked if you find yourself entranced in front of the gorgeously colored fish known as Cichlids at your local pet store. For years, these intelligent species have been among the most vibrantly colored, active, and durable freshwater fish aquariums! Hundreds of Cichlid species may be kept and cultured. Cichlids, which come in various sizes and from a variety of places, are more aggressive than other tropical fish. You may want to know “what are the most aggressive cichlids?” before picking which cichlids to add to your aquarium. With that in mind, HealthyBetta has compiled a list of the top 15 most aggressive Cichlids for your reference.

A Curated List of Most Aggressive Cichlids

Below are the topmost aggressive cichlids that we have compiled. 

Dovii Cichlid (Parachromis Dovii)

  • Scientific Name: Parachromis Dovii
  • Origin: Central American
  • Temperament: Highly aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.0 – 8.0
  • Temperature: 75–81 °F
  • Minimum tank size: 75 gallons
  • Size: 28.5 in
  • Diet: Carnivorous
Dovii Cichlid (Parachromis Dovii) – the most aggressive cichlids

The Dovii Cichlid is the most aggressive Central American cichlid, and it may be found on both sides of the Honduran, Nicaraguan, and Costa Rican rivers. It’s also known as the notorious Wolf Cichlid or Guapote in the wild, and it’s a key local commercial fishery.

The Dovii Cichlid is known for having a stunningly deep body. Females have a gold or golden base coloring and are more visible during breeding. Mature men have a greater blue tone, and dominant males are inherently brighter than that.

It should be noted that the darker the male Dovii Cichlid is, the more unhealthy it is in the tank.

When mature, the Dovii Cichlid may reach a length of 28 inches as a game fish. When they are tiny, they are not as aggressive, but things change rapidly as they reach 6′′ or larger! Their furious, fiercely aggressive character, complete with big fangs and a muscular physique, may swiftly do harm to you and your tankmates.

Five-spot cichlid (Hemichromis fasciatus)

  • Scientific Name: Hemichromis fasciatus
  • Origin: West Africa
  • Temperament: Highly aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.0
  • Temperature: 73–78 °F
  • Minimum tank size: 100 gallons
  • Size: 8.0 – 10.4 in
  • Diet: Carnivorous
Aggressive cichlids – Five-spot cichlid

Hemichromis fasciatus, often known as the banded jewelfish and the five-spot cichlid, is a kind of cichlid fish found across West Africa. It is also present in the Nile Basin, Lake Chad, and the upper Zambezi River. It has a maximum total length of 10.4 in and a typical length of 8.0 in.

The banded jewelfish has five huge, black, glossy oval spots on the side of its body and is yellow-green with a bronze iridescence. Each scale on older specimens has a brick-red dot. The mouth of Hemichromis fasciatus is rather huge and broad.

This cichlid is a fierce predator whose food consists primarily of shes. H. fasciatus is employed in sh farming to manage or control the population of shes with high reproductive capacity, such as Oreochromis niloticus, because to its carnivorous eating pattern. Because of its colorful body, the species is also commonly used as an ornamental fish and is produced and maintained in aquariums.

False yellowjacket cichlid (Parachromis motaguense)

  • Scientific Name: Parachromis motaguense
  • Origin: Central America
  • Temperament: Very aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.0 to 8.5
  • Temperature: 77 – 86°F
  • Minimum tank size: 75 gallons for pair
  • Size: 12 in
  • Diet: Carnivorous
False yellowjacket cichlid (Parachromis motaguense)

The False yellowjacket cichlid, Parachromis motaguensis, is a species of cichlid endemic to Guatemala and Honduras in Central America. This species may reach a length of 12 in. The motaguensis is less widespread in the aquarium commerce than its near sibling, the Parachromis managuensis, also known and marketed as the jaguar cichlid.

Despite their similar look, the motaguensis (also known as the Red tiger and Red dragon cichlid) has an array of vivid red spots that extend along the flanks to the base of the caudal fin (thus the variations of the common name). An astonishing array of this coloration is visible on the gills of this fish, where such color is prominent.

Breeding of Red dragon cichlid may be accomplished with minimal effort, and no special conditions are required for breeding reasons. A breeding pair of such fish will quickly spawn as long as water conditions are kept at a desirable high grade. Purchase numerous healthy and active juveniles at an early age (between 6 and 10) and raise these specimens till sexual maturity to increase your chances of getting a breeding pair.

Umbee Cichlid (Kronoheros Umbriferus)

  • Scientific Name: Kronoheros Umbriferus
  • Origin: South America
  • Temperament: Aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.1-8.0
  • Temperature:  72-80°F
  • Minimum tank size: 150 gallons
  • Size: 18-24 in
  • Diet: Carnivorous
Big G Kronoheros umbriferus. Source: Youtube/Justin Holland

Umbee Cichlids are gorgeous fish found in the Columbia River in South America. At full maturity, they grow to be rather enormous. Their faces are black, but they are distinguished by turquoise and blue-reflecting spots beneath their eyes and across their bodies.

It is quite difficult to tell a juvenile Umbee Cichlid male from a female. You probably won’t be able to determine the difference between males and girls until they’re older. The male Umbee Cichlid grows at the doubled pace of the female. Female Umbee Cichlids are smaller and typically have a duller color than males when they reach full maturity.

Umbee Cichlids are predatory fish that feed on carnivorous prey. Their diet should be heavy in protein foods. They consume live fish and invertebrates in the wild. They may, however, be trained to consume pellet food in an aquarium. These should be high-protein, high-quality pellets.

The amount of food they get and the number of times they must be fed each day are mostly determined by their size. When your Umbee Cichlid is less than 6 inches long, it should be fed at least twice a day. When they reach 6 inches in length, you can reduce their feedings to once per day. You should also vary what you feed them. They thrive on a diversified high protein diet.

Protein-rich live fish food includes blood worms, mysis shrimp, and brine shrimp. Incorporating these invertebrates into cichlids’ diet would help them imitate their natural diet. However, delivering a balanced diet based only on living foods might be challenging. As a result, high-quality pellet feed should continue to be the primary food source.

Green Texas Cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus)

  • Scientific Name: Herichthys cyanoguttatus
  • Origin: Green Texas Cichlid, Texas Cichlid, Pearlscale Cichlid
  • Temperament: Aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.5 – 8
  • Temperature: 68 – 82 °F
  • Minimum tank size: Cichlid
  • Size: 13 in
  • Diet: omnivorous
Green Texas Cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus)

The Texas cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus, originally Cichlasoma cyanoguttum) is a cichlid freshwater fish. This is the sole cichlid species found in the United States. The fish, commonly known as the Rio Grande cichlid, is native to Texas’s lower Rio Grande drainage near Brownsville and northeastern Mexico.

Herichthys cyanoguttatus may grow to be over 13 in (33 cm) long and is distinguished by distinguishing traits and specialized environmental requirements. This cichlid is distinguished by its cream and turquoise markings. Adult males grow a nuchal hump on their heads as well. This cichlid likewise enjoys water temperatures between 68 and 82 °F (20–28 °C) and is badly influenced by fast temperature fluctuations.

The cichlid’s diet is omnivorous, consisting of vegetative matter or detritus, and it frequently feeds on plants, insects, and smaller fish, as well as fish eggs. In rare circumstances, the cichlid can also be regarded as an “opportunistic carnivore,” eating on tiny vertebrates and invertebrates like small frogs and water snakes. The cichlid is a “deliberate predator,” relying on its skin’s camouflage to creep up on its target.

The Texas cichlid is often found in the aquarium trade and gained popularity among cichlid aficionados in the 1980s due to its iridescent blue and green patterns. The “green Texas cichlid” seen in pet stores is actually another species, Herichthys carpintis, whose range does not include Texas. The popular name is derived from a physical resemblance to the Texas cichlid. The “red Texas” cichlid is not an intergeneric hybrid of the Texas cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus), but of Herichthys and Amphilophus parents.

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Three-spot cichlid (Amphilophus trimaculatus)

  • Scientific Name: Amphilophus trimaculatus
  • Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Temperament: Very aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.0 – 8.0
  • Temperature: 75-80°F
  • Minimum tank size: 100 gallons
  • Size: Up to 15 in
  • Diet: Carnivorous
Three-spot cichlid (Amphilophus trimaculatus)

The three spot cichlid (Cichlasoma trimaculatum), often known as the trimac or red-eyed cichlid, is a cichlid species native to Mexico and Central America that belongs to the Cichlasomatinae subfamily. It is not commonly encountered as an aquarium fish. Although FishBase still lists it as a very abnormal member of Cichlasoma, other authorities, such as Catalog of Fishes, have reassigned it to the genus Amphilophus.

The three spot cichlid is a huge, heavy-bodied cichlid with three spots. It has a base color of green or yellow with prominent dots on its sides. The male grows considerably larger than the female and may reach a height of 15 feet “His fins are longer and more pointed, and he has a prominent red mark below his gills. The female is smaller, developing to be 9-10 years old “as well as a less prominent red mark When the man matures, he may develop a nuchal hump.

The three-spot cichlid mostly feeds on tiny fishes and invertebrates, including aquatic and terrestrial insects. A huge female may lay over 1,000 eggs and achieve sexual maturity at 3.1–3.9 in, while males reach sexual maturity at 4.7–5.5 in. The couple normally chooses a flat stone to spawn on, and both parents vigorously defend the eggs and tend to the young once they hatch.

Cuban cichlid (Nandopsis tetracanthus)

  • Scientific Name: Nandopsis tetracanthus
  • Origin: Central America
  • Temperament: Moderately aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 70-82°F
  • Minimum tank size: 100 gallons
  • Size: Up to 8″
  • Diet: Carnivorous
Cuban cichlid (Nandopsis tetracanthus)

This species is native to Central America and is unique to Cuba, but specimens have been obtained from Barbados, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic as well. This cichlid may be found in both freshwater and brackish water, which is unusual for a cichlid. There is no need to add salt, and I’ve kept this species in hard, alkaline freshwater without issue for years. It may grow to be as large as 20cm/8″, with normal females being approximately 13cm/5″ and males somewhat larger.

For their size, Cuban cichlids are moderately aggressive. It is best kept as a sexed pair in a 120cm/48″ species tank. Unless you can find a couple for sale, you’ll have to acquire a batch of baby fish and raise them, then find new homes for the surplus fish. They mingle nicely with other robust Central American cichlids, such as Vieja, if given lots of space and places to hide from more dominating species.

Wild fish stomach investigations revealed that they eat shrimp, worms, aquatic insects, and tiny fishes such as livebearers and gobies. Aquarium fish thrive on high-quality cichlid pellets, whole shrimp, and earthworms. They are unlikely to be mistaken with other Central Americans; however, they do have a passing similarity to Parachromis managuensis.

Between April and June, they spawn in weedy regions of fast-flowing rivers and lakes. Aquarium spawnings are uncommon since they are not commonly preserved.

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Sieve Cichlid (Nandopsis Grammodes)

  • Scientific Name: Chiapaheros Grammodes
  • Origin: Central American
  • Temperament: Semi-aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 70-82 °F
  • Minimum tank size: 75 gallons for a single adult, 125+ gallons for a pair
  • Size: 12 in
  • Diet: Carnivorous
Sieve Cichlid (Nandopsis Grammodes)

As the name implies, the Sieve Cichlid, also known as Mini Dovii Cichlid or Lesser Wolf Cichlid, is a Dovii Cichlid in smaller packaging. It is a Mexican species, unlike many other neotropical cichlids.

Mini Doviis are eye-catching fish. It is well known for its huge head, and there are numerous red-orange patches on its head and body. An uneven black stripe runs along the center of the shirt.

Compared to the Parachromis Dovii, which can reach lengths of up to 28 inches, the Mini Dovii Cichlid can only reach lengths of up to 12 inches. They also develop more slowly than most CA cichlids, especially when they reach 8-10 inches. Their speed and perseverance place them among the fiercest and most proficient combatants when fighting with their tankmates. When protecting their turf, they will aim for their adversary’s eyes and necks, believe it or not.

Black Nasty Cichlid (Nandopsis Haitiensis)

  • Scientific Name: Nandopsis Haitiensis
  • Origin: Central American
  • Temperament: Aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 6.5-8.0
  • Temperature: 68-73 °F
  • Minimum tank size: 75 gallons for a single adult, 125+ gallons for a pair
  • Size: 15 in
  • Diet: Omnivorous
Haitiensis Black nasty. Source: Youtube/Andy Woods cichlids

The Black Nasty Cichlid, sometimes known as the Haitian Cichlid, is a big neotropical cichlid that lives in fast-moving freshwater lakes and rivers in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Black Nasty Cichlids have a silver base color throughout their bodies, with a strong contrast pattern on the head and fins. They can grow to be up to 15 inches long.

This species has a well-deserved moniker, and the “Nasty” half of its name is all there is to it. Males and females are both vicious, violent, and strong. When mixing males with other fish in a communal tank, keep in mind that they will devour practically everything they are fed.

Green Guapote Cichlid (Nandopsis Beani)

  • Scientific Name: Nandopsis Beani
  • Origin: Central American
  • Temperament: Aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.4 – 8
  • Temperature: 74 – 78 °F
  • Minimum tank size: 75 gallons for a single adult, 300+ gallons for a pair
  • Size: 11 in
  • Diet: Omnivorous
Green Guapote Cichlid (Nandopsis Beani)

Nandopsis Beani is one of the most difficult cichlids for enthusiasts to get because it is currently fairly scarce. Another wonderful monster fish’ South and Central American Cichlid is the green guapote Cichlid, which comes from Mexico’s Pacific side.

It is more frequent to see their distinctive green with yellow color throughout the dorsal surface and fins. This species changes color according to its mood, ranging from dark greens to yellow tints.

Nandopsis Beani may reach a height of 11 inches. Like most aggressive Cichlids, they are territorial animals that will pursue and kill without rest. I strongly advise you to keep them with cichlids that can protect themselves because they are natural-born fighters that are not very skilled at fighting back.

If you want to raise green guapote cichlids successfully, you should be aware that they are prone to bloat in bad water conditions.

Red Devil Cichlid (Amphilophus Labiatus)

  • Scientific Name: Amphilophus Labiatus
  • Origin: Central American
  • Temperament: Aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 6.8-7.2
  • Temperature: 72-77 °F
  • Minimum tank size: 55 gallons
  • Size: 12 in
  • Diet: Omnivorous
Red Devil Cichlid (Amphilophus Labiatus)

The Red Devil Cichlid is a fantastic choice for a hobbyist looking for a large, charismatic fish. As one of the larger Central American cichlids, they may add color and personality to your aquarium.

The Red Devils are distinguished by their vibrant color and thick, orange lips. Their more prominent appearance in the wild is attributable to environmental variables like nutrition and sunshine exposure. Some brightly colored examples have a black-tipped tail and fins and are lots of personalities.

Red Devil Cichlids are aggressive and possessive of other fish species. They will murder tankmates who cannot protect themselves with their razor-sharp fangs and jaws, making them truly tough killers.

Butterikoferi Cichlid (Tilapia butterkofferi)

  • Scientific Name: Tilapia butterkofferi
  • Origin: Western Africa
  • Temperament: Highly aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.8-8.6
  • Temperature: 72-82°F
  • Minimum tank size: 70 gallons
  • Size: 16 in
  • Diet: Omnivorous
Butterikoferi Cichlid (Tilapia butterkofferi)

The Butterikoferi Cichlid, often known as the Zebra Tilapia, is a rare freshwater fish endemic to Western African river systems. Zebra Tilapia is one of many outstanding African cichlids for your next aquarium pet, thanks to its enormous size and appealing patterns.

The African Buttikoferi BumbleBee Cichlids feature black and white vertical stripes, similar to bees. The name alone tells you all you need to know. They are herbivores that eat plants and seek them out for protection from other predators or food sources. They are not, however, sweet animals and should never be trusted.

Butterikoferi Cichlids are notorious for their powerful, crushing bite and occasionally tearing off other fish. I’d been on this boat several times before, but I’d never had any close brushes with these men until last week when one of them gave me 9 stitches! Remember that these creatures can grow to be 16 inches tall, letting them compete with Doviis and Red Devils.

Jaguar Cichlid (Parachromis Managuense)

  • Scientific Name: Parachromis Managuense
  • Origin: Central America
  • Temperament: Aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 70-82°F
  • Minimum tank size: 125 gallons
  • Size: 16 in
  • Diet: Omnivorous
Jaguar Cichlid (Parachromis Managuense)

Jaguar cichlids, also known as Guapote tigres, are endemic to Central American freshwater settings. This lovely species is a popular and pleasant companion for the more experienced fishkeeper as a big species of CA Cichlid.

The Jaguar Cichlid has dull silver scales and heavy black patterns that help the oval-shaped body blend in with the water like a Jaguar fur. Spiny rays support the dorsal and anal fins, protecting them from other predatory fish.

The reason we included these creatures on the list is obvious: they are Dovii relatives. You can only imagine what they’ll do to other fish that intrude on their territory. It should be noted that the average mature size of a Jaguar Cichlid is 14-16 inches. They will occasionally battle to death due to their pharyngeal teeth, big mouth, and aggressive nature.

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Istlanum Cichlid (Cichlasoma Istlanum)

  • Scientific Name: Cichlasoma Istlanum
  • Origin: Central America
  • Temperament: Aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.2 – 7.6
  • Temperature: 74 – 80 °F
  • Minimum tank size: 75 gallons
  • Size: 10 in
  • Diet: Omnivorous
Cichlasoma istlanum. Source: Youtube/YuKai Chen

Istlanum Cichlid, the other difficult-to-obtain Cichlid on the list, is native to Mexico’s Balsas river basin. They share characteristics with most cichlid species, including vivid colors and personality traits.

This species’ body has a yellow base color with many black dots running down the middle of the flanks. The transparent fins are speckled with iridescent speckles and have a dark green head.

Male istlanums can grow to be 10 inches long, while females are always smaller. Some varieties might be rather quiet, while others can be quite aggressive. The Istlanum Cichlid is a hardy cichlid that resembles the Umbee cichlid.

Flowerhorn Cichlid (Cichlasoma sp.)

  • Scientific Name: Cichlasoma sp
  • Origin: Central America
  • Temperament: Semi-Aggressive cichlids
  • pH: 7.4–8.0
  • Temperature: 80–85 °F
  • Minimum tank size: 75 gallons
  • Size: 18 in
  • Diet: Omnivorous
Flowerhorn Cichlid (Cichlasoma sp.)

The Flowerhorn Cichlid (luohans) is not found in the wild since it is a hybrid species that has been developed solely in captivity throughout time. For years, enthusiasts have been drawn to their vibrant colors, forehead hump, and personality.

The Flowerhorn Cichlid is most known for its huge and vibrantly colored nuchal hump (AKA kok) on the forehead, which is the main distinguishing characteristic of this species and is generally more noticeable on males.

Flowerhorn cichlids are aggressive and territorial, and they may dominate almost everything in the tank. They may grow to be roughly 12′′ long, with some examples reaching 18′′. Flowerhorn cichlids require a minimum tank size of 75 gallons and are not ideal for communal tanks.

FAQs About Most Aggressive Cichlids

Now it’s time to handle some of the commonly asked questions about aggressive cichlids.

What Is The Most Aggressive Cichlid Fish?

As previously said, the Wolf Cichlid is a notorious fish owing to its extremely aggressive character. While they are beautiful and incredibly bright, their disposition is so distinct that the term “dovii” has come to be associated with violence.

Tankmates are hit or miss, and most of the time they miss. If there is a hit, it usually does not last long since Wolf Cichlids grow very swiftly, eventually reaching a size of over two feet. Most keepers either relocate their Dovii to larger ponds or acquire custom-built tanks to house them in.

While they are still youngsters, they may do well in a tank with other like-sized, aggressive cichlids. Their tank should have a thick sand bed, boulders, caverns, and wide-open swimming areas. Wolf cichlids like caverns and rocks to hide in/among because, despite their aggressive temperament, they may be surprised. Furthermore, Wolf Cichlids exhibit a keen interest in activity beyond the tank’s boundaries and may even consider portions of the outside space to be part of their domain.

What Is The Least Aggressive Cichlid Fish?

HealthyBetta has picked the top five least aggressive cichlids that can be kept alongside other fish of a similar temperament if properly cared for:

Bolivian rams: They are a diminutive species, reaching just around three and a half inches when mature, and may thus be housed in a reasonably sized tank alongside either their own species or other African cichlids. They are yellow and white in color and have an appealing form.

German blue rams: These fish have a vivid blue and yellow body, a red head, and yellow fins that are all adorned with vibrant blue dots. Up to six German blue rams can be kept together in a 40-gallon aquarium since they are a placid dwarf species and one of the most compatible African cichlids.

Keyhole: They are among the least aggressive cichlids that prefer to flee and hide rather than fight and harass. They are brownish on top and purple on the bottom. At adulthood, they may grow to be up to five inches long and can be housed in a community tank with other Keyholes and/or freshwater species.

Yellow labs: They are a bright yellow with black coloration on their fins. Although these African cichlids can be violent towards their own species and will attack any yellow fish, they will normally ignore non-yellow fish. Because they may grow to be four inches tall and reproduce rather easily and prolifically in the aquarium, it is better to have only one Yellow lab per tank.

Blue acaras: With their blue and black pattern, blue acaras are a sight to behold. They are usually placid with large fish, but can attack smaller fish. Because blue acara grow to be seven inches long, they will require at least a 50-gallon aquarium and several huge tank mates.

Why Are My Cichlids Attacking Each Other?

Cichlids’ inherently aggressive disposition, notably their need to compete for food, is one of the primary reasons they become hostile. Cichlids live in highly competitive habitats in which they must continually compete for food.

Cichlids kill one other for a variety of reasons, but they all have something in common: they are territorial and hierarchical fish. They compete to be the alpha because alpha rights include their own protected area, first dibs on food, and the right to reproduce. 

A tank’s boss also breaks up conflicts between other fish, can walk around the entire tank without being attacked, and pushes sand about to create the tank more to his taste. Many animals exhibit this habit. Cichlids, on the other hand, are exceptionally violent in protecting their place and territory. To protect them, they will battle to the death.

Why Do My Cichlids Move Sand?

Aside from Cichlid hostility, these fish are known for shifting sand and excavating holes. They’ll uproot plants, make craters, and even dig into the ground.

Cichlids move sand and dig holes because it is instinctive. They do this to attract females for breeding by building a nest or a fortress. And, because the alpha has the most color and control over the ‘landscaping,’ he will almost always be the one doing it. They have been known to attack other fish that interfere with the digging and mating process.

How To Stop Cichlid Bullying & Aggression?

Cichlids are popular among aquarists because of their fascinating activity, relative ease of breeding, and vibrant colors. However, many cichlid aquariums fail to owe to poor planning. Careful preparation is essential. While this hostility will never be completely removed (and who would want to? – it is part of what makes these fish so intriguing), it can be decreased to the point that you do not come home one day to discover half your tank wiped out.

Mixing fish of similar size and temperament, combining fish of various color and patterns, suitable feeding, combining fish that occupy different levels in the aquarium, giving enough horizontal space, offering enough cover, sexing your cichlids, overstocking, and reorganizing your aquarium are the major strategies used to prevent aggressiveness.

Tips to Stop Cichlid Aggression. Source: Youtube/The Fish Files

Final Thoughts About The Most Aggressive Cichlids

“Which cichlids are most aggressive?” We hope that with the list of the top 15 most aggressive cichlids above, you can find the answers for yourself. You can consider purchasing these fish for your aquariums, but they are aggressive so you need to choose carefully. It’s worth being kept in mind that in addition to keeping your water clean, appropriate species selection, feeding, stocking, and hardscaping make your Cichlids happier and more pleased. This is how to keep a Cichlid communal tank quiet. You may also use these suggestions with different types of fish.

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